Irvin Delta II Parawing

        



                              Performance Data of the  Delta II Parawing

      Rate of Descent: (Steady Glide)...............14 - 1 6 ft / sec.
                                   50% Brakes..................15 - 17 ft / sec. (approx).
                                   75% Brakes..................16 - 20 ft / sec. (approx).
                                   Full Brakes....................20 - 30 ft / sec. (approx).
     Full spiral (after one revolution) ............... 30 - 50 ft / sec.

     Turn rate (360
)
                 From straight flight ........................ 4 sec.
                 After 1 revolution ........................... 2.8 sec.
                 Suspended weight ........................... 120 - 250 lbs
                 Maximum lift / drag ratio ............... 2/1
                 Manoeuvres ................................... Glide, brake, turn, stall



The Irvin Delta II Parawing high performance canopy was first aquired by The Red Devils Free Fall Team in the late 1960's. This triangular gliding parachute was a new concept in design and performance, bearing no resemblance to its forerunners and heralding  a completely new era in both sport and military parachuting.
It was manufactured by Irving Air Chute Company, whose founder, Mr Leslie Irvin, made the worlds first freefall parachute descent over Dayton Ohio in 1919.


        


Since 1958, when America entered into the exploration of space, the requirement for parachute recovery systems led to the development of the Delta Wing.  After extensive testing and numerous modifications the Delta Wing was introduced into the world of freefall parachuting and was used by The Red Devils Free Fall Team.  The Wing is triangular in shape and has a system of radial slots on its upper surface whichprovide directionally controlled airstreams enabling it to turn 360 in 3 seconds and glide up to 15 miles per hour in nil wind conditions, descending at speeds ranging from 14 to 30 feet per second. 
It had a glide ratio of 2 to 1, that is to say it would travel 20 feet forward for 10 feet downwards.

The Wing was controlled by the steering lines attached to the parachutist's harness and manipulated by the parachutist.  The high performance of the Wing with its aerofoil design  enabled the experienced parachutist to land with great accuracy, even in relatively high winds.  Though reasonably complex to handle it was extremely spectacular from a spectator's point of view.

Watch this short clip and you will see a Wing performing a spiral it is quite an impressive canopy.

        



            Click here to see more photos of the Delta II Parawing


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